Frequent question: What language do people speak in South Africa?

What are the top 3 languages spoken in South Africa?

Language in South Africa

According to census data from 2011, Zulu is the most widely spoken language in the country with 11.6 million speakers. This is followed by Xhosa with 8.15 million speakers, and Afrikaans, with 6.85 million speakers.

What language is spoken in South Africa Cape Town?

English. South African English is spoken in a variety of accents, and is usually peppered with words from Afrikaans and African languages. It was brought to South Africa by the British who declared it the official language of the Cape Colony in 1822.

How do u say hello in South Africa?

Predominantly spoken in KwaZulu-Natal, Zulu is understood by at least 50% of South Africans.

  1. Hello! – Sawubona! ( …
  2. Hello! – Molo (to one) / Molweni (to many) …
  3. Hello! – Haai! / Hallo! …
  4. Hello – Dumela (to one) / Dumelang (to many) …
  5. Hello – Dumela. …
  6. Hello – Dumela (to one) / Dumelang (to many) …
  7. Hello – Avuxeni. …
  8. Hello – Sawubona.

Are Afrikaners and Boers the same?

The Boers, also known as Afrikaners, were the descendants of the original Dutch settlers of southern Africa. … By mid June 1900, British forces had captured most major Boer cities and formally annexed their territories, but the Boers launched a guerrilla war that frustrated the British occupiers.

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Can you walk around Cape Town?

2. Re: Is it safe to walk alone in Cape Town? Only a very few areas / suburbs of Cape Town are safe by European standards. So no you shouldn’t walk around in the same way that you might in a European city without knowing a bit about each area.

What is the main religion in South Africa?

Almost 80% of South African population adheres to the Christian faith. Other major religious groups are Hindus, Muslims and Jews. A minority of South African population does not belong to any of the major religions, but regard themselves as traditionalists or of no specific religious affiliation.