How are African fabrics printed?

What do African prints mean?

If you follow black women’s fashion trends, you’re familiar with African prints—those bold, beautiful designs that give women’s clothing a decidedly Afrocentric vibe. Executed in bright, eye-catching colors or high-contrast black and white, they’re sometimes referred to as “ethnic prints” or “tribal prints.”

What is African material called?

What is commonly known as “African fabric” goes by a multitude of names: Dutch wax print, Real English Wax, Veritable Java Print, Guaranteed Dutch Java, Veritable Dutch Hollandais. The development of the African print fabric has been referred to as the “result of a long historical process of imitation and mimicry”.

Why is it called wax print?

The method is called wax-resist dying because the wax ‘resists’ the dye from penetrating the entire cloth, which is how patterns are made. It also goes by the names of super wax, java, and Ankara, with ‘wax’ named fabrics having a somewhat glossy, stiff, waxy feeling surface even though they are roller printed.

Where did African print originate from?

African wax prints actually came from the Netherlands. In the second half of the 19th century, fuelled by the industrial revolution and colonial expansion, new markets opened in the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia) as well as Africa.

Where does the name Ankara come from?

The name Ankara is originated from the Celtic word of Ancyra, meaning Anchor.

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