In what way did geography affect early African kingdom?

How did geography affect early African kingdoms?

The geography of Africa helped to shape the history and development of the culture and civilizations of Ancient Africa. The geography impacted where people could live, important trade resources such as gold and salt, and trade routes that helped different civilizations to interact and develop.

How did geography impact the West African kingdoms?

Geography and Trade Geography was a major factor in the development of West African societies. Settled communities grew south of the Sahara, where the land permitted farming. Geography also influenced trading patterns. Communities traded with one another for items they could not produce locally.

How did geography impact trade in Africa?

How did geography affect trade in West Africa? More people had to trade, so settlements made more money. … They charged fees for trading activity and used their money to expand. More people came to live in the city, so they gave out more jobs.

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How did geography influence the settlement and economy of medieval African empires?

How did the geography influence the settlement and economy of early Africa? In the forest areas, the soil was poor, but farmers could grow tree crops such as kola and palm trees. … The different areas of Africa had different resources to trade, including salt, gold, cloth, palm oils, grains, kola nuts, and yams.

What were the major kingdoms of ancient Africa and what led to their rise and fall?

What patterns are repeated in Ghana, Mali, and Songhai? Answer: The causes for all three kingdoms to rise and fall were based on leadership and economic issues. Ghana rose as a result of a good economy and fell as a result of losing its monopoly on profitable trade routes.

How did geography affect early African kingdoms quizlet?

How did geography affect early African kingdoms? Natural resources brought wealth and power. What is the main reason Europe colonized Africa? In what ways are poverty and the environment related?

Why did the West African kingdoms decline?

With the gradual abolition of slavery in the European colonial empires during the 19th century, slave trade again became less lucrative and the West African empires entered a period of decline, and mostly collapsed by the end of the 19th century.

How did kingdoms develop in West Africa?

How did the Kingdoms of West Africa develop and prosper? The were created by men who became wealthy because of the gold-salt trade. … Their wealth gave them power turning them and their descendants into powerful lords of land and people.

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How did the growth of trade in West African kingdoms impact Islam?

Islam promoted trade between West Africa and the Mediterranean. The religion developed and widened the trans-Saharan Caravan trade. … Muslims from North Africa came in their numbers and settled in the commercial centres. This helped in the development of the cities such as Timbuctu, Gao, Jenne and Kano.

How did the desert influence settlement and trade in early Africa?

How did the geography of West Africa influence settlement and trade? Sahara Desert in the north, the west and south is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, mountains to the east. … They could even make enough to trade. sometimes these communities became markets for trade attracting people and growing in size.

How did the geography of the Sahara Desert affect trading in West Africa?

Explanation: West Afica had the advantage of being the closest geographically to the Sahara desert, and the wealthy Islamic Empires to the north. How ever the Sahara desert was a significant barrier to travel and trade. Caravans crossing the desert could easily get lost in the drifting, unmarked sands of the desert.

How does Africa’s geography affect its economy?

Africa’s natural resource economy contributes greatly to the continent’s built environment, or human-made buildings and structures. The largest engineering projects and urban areas are directly linked to the production and trade of resources such as water, oil, and minerals.