Question: Which African country was originally known as Northern Rhodesia?

What African country was Rhodesia?

Rhodesia (/roʊˈdiːʒə/, /roʊˈdiːʃə/), officially from 1970 the Republic of Rhodesia, was an unrecognised state in Southern Africa from 1965 to 1979, equivalent in territory to modern Zimbabwe.

Where did the name Northern Rhodesia come from?

Rhodesia, region, south-central Africa, now divided into Zimbabwe in the south and Zambia in the north. Named after British colonial administrator Cecil Rhodes, it was administered by the British South Africa Company in the 19th century and exploited mostly for its gold, copper, and coal deposits.

What was Rhodesia called before colonization?

The territory of ‘Southern Rhodesia’ was originally referred to as ‘South Zambezia’ but the name ‘Rhodesia’ came into use in 1895.

Who colonized South Africa?

1652: An official colonisation from the south by the Dutch VOC. This colonisation came to an end when Britain finally took the country from the Netherlands in 1806 (actually for the second time). 1806: An official colonisation of the country by Great Britain.

Is Zambia a British colony?

Zambia’s colonization began in 1888 when the British South Africa Company secured mineral rights in the area. It became a British Protectorate in 1899, being governed as part of Barotziland-North-Western Rhodesia. Zambia became an independent country in 1964.

What was Zimbabwe called?

Zimbabwe was formerly known as Southern Rhodesia (1898), Rhodesia (1965), and Zimbabwe Rhodesia (1979).

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Why did the British colonized Zambia?

The British government hoped to increase white settlement as part of a wider strategy to strengthen British influence between South Africa and Kenya. Land was reserved for white ownership along the railway line, in the far north, and in the east.