Quick Answer: How many languages are spoken in Africa today that derive from the Bantu?

How many official languages are spoken in Africa?

Important South African languages are Zulu and Afrikaans (related to Dutch). English, French and Portuguese are important languages: 130, 115 and 20 million speak them as secondary in general.

Demographics.

Arabic (North Africa, Horn of Africa) 100 native + 30 secondary
Umbundu (Angola) 4
Northern Sotho (South Africa) 4

What countries speak Bantu?

Communities speaking Bantu languages are indigenous to twenty-seven African countries: Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, CAR, Comoros, Congo, DRC, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mayotte, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, …

How do you say hello in Bantu language?

1. Hujambo — “Hello!” A friendly “hujambo” goes a long way. 2. Habari — Also means “hello” or “good morning.” Use this one when speaking with older people.

What race is Bantu?

They are Black African speakers of Bantu languages of several hundred indigenous ethnic groups. The Bantu live in sub-Saharan Africa, spread over a vast area from Central Africa across the African Great Lakes to Southern Africa.

What is hello in Swahili?

To say hello in Swahili, say jambo. You can also say hujambo (pronounced hoo-JAHM-boh) if you want to greet someone more formally. Habari (pronounced hah-BAH-ree), which literally translates to “news,” is often used to say hi too.

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Where do the Bantu live now?

Today, the Bantu-speaking peoples are found in many sub-Saharan countries such as Congo, Rwanda, Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Angola, South Africa, Malawi, Zambia, and Burundi among other countries in the Great Lakes region.

What religion is Bantu?

Traditional religion is common among the Bantu, with a strong belief in magic. Christianity and Islam are also practiced.

Is Shona a Bantu language?

Shona is a language from the Bantu family and is spoken in Zimbabwe. It is the mother tongue of 75% of the people of Zimbabwe.