What language is mostly spoken in South Africa?

Is English the most spoken language in South Africa?

In South Africa, Afrikaans may not be the most widely spoken language – but it is still a bigger language than English.

Language in South Africa.

# Language Native Speakers
1 IsiZulu 11.58 million
2 IsiXhosa 8.15 million
3 Afrikaans 6.85 million
4 English 4.89 million

What language is spoken in South Africa Cape Town?

English. South African English is spoken in a variety of accents, and is usually peppered with words from Afrikaans and African languages. It was brought to South Africa by the British who declared it the official language of the Cape Colony in 1822.

How do u say hello in South Africa?

Predominantly spoken in KwaZulu-Natal, Zulu is understood by at least 50% of South Africans.

  1. Hello! – Sawubona! ( …
  2. Hello! – Molo (to one) / Molweni (to many) …
  3. Hello! – Haai! / Hallo! …
  4. Hello – Dumela (to one) / Dumelang (to many) …
  5. Hello – Dumela. …
  6. Hello – Dumela (to one) / Dumelang (to many) …
  7. Hello – Avuxeni. …
  8. Hello – Sawubona.

Is South Africa an English speaking country?

According to Statistics South Africa, only 8.4% of South African households speak English – that’s just 4.7 million people in a country of 56 million. English is only the sixth-most common home language in the country, after Zulu (24.7%), Xhosa (15.6%), Afrikaans (12.1%), Sepedi (9.8%), and Setswana (8.9%).

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Can you walk around Cape Town?

2. Re: Is it safe to walk alone in Cape Town? Only a very few areas / suburbs of Cape Town are safe by European standards. So no you shouldn’t walk around in the same way that you might in a European city without knowing a bit about each area.

What is the main religion in South Africa?

Almost 80% of South African population adheres to the Christian faith. Other major religious groups are Hindus, Muslims and Jews. A minority of South African population does not belong to any of the major religions, but regard themselves as traditionalists or of no specific religious affiliation.