You asked: What is the language of North Africa?

What is the second most spoken language in North Africa?

2. AMHARIC. Amharic is one of the main languages spoken in Ethiopia by over 20 million speakers. It is considered the second most spoken Semitic language in the world after Arabic – these are languages that originate from the Middle East alongside Hebrew, Tigrinya and more.

What is the first language in Africa?

The most spoken language on the continent of Africa today is Swahili. It is the native language of the Bantu group known as the Swahili people. It is spoken in over ten African countries and has more than a 100 million native speakers.

What is the name for the market places in North Africa?

Resembling strips of open shops, large urban markets often develop into permanent shopping streets. Most commerce in rural North Africa takes place in traditional markets called suqs.

Which language is spoken the most?

The most spoken languages in the world

  1. English (1.132 million speakers) Native speakers: 379 million. …
  2. Mandarin (1.117 million speakers) …
  3. Hindi (615 million speakers) …
  4. Spanish (534 million speakers) …
  5. French (280 million speakers) …
  6. Arabic (274 million speakers) …
  7. Bengali (265 million speakers) …
  8. Russian (258 million speakers)
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What is hello in Swahili?

To say hello in Swahili, say jambo. You can also say hujambo (pronounced hoo-JAHM-boh) if you want to greet someone more formally. Habari (pronounced hah-BAH-ree), which literally translates to “news,” is often used to say hi too.

Does Africa speak Arabic?

‍While most speakers live in North Africa, estimates say that over 150 million people in Africa speak Arabic as a native language. … Arabic is the official language of Algeria, Comoros, Chad, Djibouti, Egypt, Eritrea, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia.

What does bantu mean in Africa?

[2] Abantu (or ‘Bantu’ as it was used by colonists) is the Zulu word for people. It is the plural of the word ‘umuntu’, meaning ‘person’, and is based on the stem ‘–ntu’ plus the plural prefix ‘aba’. This original meaning changed through the history of South Africa.